Mayfield mother's grief becomes healing book

Photo courtesy of Lori Scott

Lori Scott of Mayfield holds a copy of her new book "Surrender At Rocky Point." The book is designed to help people work through their grief by relying on God and biblically based principles.

Lori Scott calls them her "Rocky Point principles."

They are the truths she said God taught her as she grieved for her 17-year old son, Jake, who drowned in 2009 at Rocky Point in Kentucky Lake.

A few of them are:

• What you do not surrender to God will remain broken.

• If you only focus on what is missing, then you will miss out on life.

• God is in control of all His creations.

• There is no teacher like God.

Dozens of the principles, many with accompanying Bible verses, are sprinkled throughout Scott's newly published book, "Surrender At Rocky Point." Some are simple, others profound, but she hopes all will help comfort those who are grieving and point them toward spiritual healing through God.

Scott, of Mayfield, will sign her book from 2-4 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 24 at The Good News Shoppe in Mayfield.

In the book, Scott details the 45-day search for Jake, one of three teenage duck hunters who drowned after their boat capsized, along with her eventual surrender of the search and her life to her Heavenly Father. She talks candidly about the toll of grief on her marriage, the attempts to find comfort in the distraction of her job and her realization of what church is about.

She also talks about the difficulties of trusting and faith and the obstacles along the way, such as when the tornado that ripped through Mayfield in 2016 destroyed the family's home.

In the end, she said, she hopes the book is not just her story, but also a guidebook.

"It's help," she said. "It's healing. This is a grief handbook, is what it is. We didn't want to put that on the cover because we don't want to confine it. Someone who is going through divorce or hardship can look at this and learn from it."

She said she thinks it may also be helpful for teenagers who need to reprioritze what is important and to adults thinking about decreasing life's sometimes frantic pace.

Scott said she always knew she would someday write about her experiences, but she was strengthened in her resolve to do so after being asked to speak about them to others and after having attended funerals where other parents mourned their children. She wanted something that would not only prove to be help from someone who had been there but also something to give hope for the future.

The book is also the result of the very first of her "Rocky Point principles:" When you are hurting, go out and help someone. There is a blessing in it somewhere.

Those were the words of a pastor who comforted the boys' families during the search and something Scott said she could not accept at first.

Learning and taking to heart many of these principles was not easy, Scott said. In fact, they turned her life around.

"When I was young, I saw church as a place filled with rules," Scott said. "When I was put in this position of dire need, I saw it was nothing but love."

Throughout the book, she gently encourages people to seek their help through reading the Scriptures and through daily prayer.

"When you allow God to go to work healing what is broken, he will heal," she said. "If you don't give it to him, of course you're going to be stuck in your grief."

"Surrender At Rocky Point" is available now on amazon.com and will be in stock Aug. 24 locally at The Good News Shoppe for $10. Others interested in a copy may contact Scott by email at loriascott01@gmail.com.